DNA-Based Animal Vaccines Providing Growth Impetus for Overall Global Vaccines Market

The DNA vaccine segment of the animal vaccines market accounted for the highest growth in veterinary vaccine technology during 2014. Continued current innovation in the field seems likely to continue to drive this trend and thus diversify the animal vaccines market in general. DNA vaccines, particularly in the current animal vaccine market, offer various advantages over more traditional vaccination approaches. It enhances the immune systems response via an uptake in the overall quality and extent from the body, as well as carrying a stronger safety record than other applied veterinary approaches. It has been proven to combat both infectious diseases and malignant cancerous forms, breaking the tolerance these cancerous cells hold in the animal's body, which is a key focus for the vaccination development companies moving forward. With Dr Niranjan Sardesai of Inovio Pharmaceuticals declaring that the past ten years has been potentially the 'decade of DNA vaccines', perhaps exploitation of their cost-effectiveness will also contribute to a continued growth in CAGR.
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Pioneering Gene Therapy May Save Babies’ Lives

SMA, the most common childhood disease of its type, arises from a recessive defect, meaning both mom and dad have to carry it and that each pregnancy brings a 25 percent risk of a baby born with a mutation in a gene called SMN1. Researchers have developed a Gene Therapy treatment for the disease which has shown to have significantly improved the condition of mice used in the experiments. In a small scale test on 8 infants the treatment has shown to improve or at least maintain their condition.
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Promising Gene Therapy for Friedreich’s Ataxia Based on Frataxin Expression

A team led by researchers at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid in Spain recently published new data on a gene therapy for Friedreich’s ataxia based on the expression of the human frataxin gene from artificial systems. The study is entitled “Delivery of the 135 kb human frataxin genomic DNA locus gives rise to different frataxin isoforms” and was published in the journal Genomics. Friedreich’s ataxia is a rare inherited neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive damage of the nervous system with degeneration of the spinal cord and peripheral nerves that leads to muscle weakness, sensory loss, balance deficits and lack of voluntary coordination of muscle movements. The disease is caused by a mutation in a gene called frataxin (FXN) that leads to a defective expression of the frataxin protein. Disease onset is usually during childhood or adolescence and the disorder leads to progressive disability, dependence on a wheelchair and reduced life expectancy. Currently, there is no effective approved treatment for the disease.
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Novartis Places Big, Broad Bet on Cancer Immunotherapy

Novartis is well placed in the hot field of cancer immunotherapy, despite being behind rivals in developing immune system-boosting drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors, a top executive at the Swiss drugmaker said on Monday. Last year, Novartis bought CoStim Pharmaceuticals, giving it access to a so-called PD-1 checkpoint inhibitor, and in March this year it signed a deal with Aduro Biotech, securing access to a novel kind of immunotherapy approach called STING. As a result, the Swiss group is rapidly building an extensive presence in multiple immunotherapy approaches, opening the door to opportunities to create different drug cocktails.
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Press Release: Ichor Partner Scancell Announces Update on SCIB1 Phase 1/2 Clinical Trial in Stage III and IV Melanoma Patients

SAN DIEGO, JUNE 2, 2015 -- Ichor Medical Systems, Inc. (Ichor) is pleased to announce that their partner Scancell Holdings plc (Scancell) presented updated and very encouraging data from the ongoing Phase 1/2 clinical trial of SCIB1, its DNA ImmunoBody® being developed for the treatment of patients with melanoma, at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting in Chicago. The trial is an open label, non-randomized study to characterize the safety and tolerability of SCIB1 administered using Ichor’s TriGridTM delivery system, as well as provide initial assessment of the ability of SCIB1 to delay or prevent disease recurrence in patients with Stage III/IV melanoma.
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Gene Therapy Shows Early Promise Against Deadly Brain Cancer

Early trials of a new form of gene therapy may give hope to patients battling glioblastoma, the most deadly form of brain cancer. Called AdV-Tk therapy, the new treatment involves two steps. As the researchers explained it, the first step involves taking DNA from the herpes virus and injecting it into tumor cells, and then attacking those DNA-tagged cells with a powerful drug. In the second step, the drug helps spur the patient's immune systems to eliminate more of the cancer cells over time. All of the patients in the study had also undergone surgeries aimed at minimizing the tumor, the researchers noted
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Scientists Closing in on Vaccine to Control High Blood Pressure

A new study indicates that scientists have inched closer to developing a vaccine to control blood pressure amid lingering issues with cardiovascular disease, including within the Hispanic/Latino community. Among Hispanics who've experienced a stroke, 72 percent had high blood pressure, compared to 66 percent in non-Hispanic whites. Osaka University in Japan has led the advancement in blood pressure vaccine, and the study's findings appeared in the journal Hypertension on Tuesday, May 26, in an article titled "Long-Term Reduction of High Blood Pressure by Angiotensin II DNA Vaccine in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.
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‘Cell-Squeezing’ Expands Options for Immunotherapy Vaccines

Using microfluidic technology, scientists have developed a way to squeeze immune system B cells so their membranes develop temporary holes, allowing the insertion of antigens that program specific immune responses. The technique promises to open new ways to realize the dream of immunotherapy - using patients' own immune systems to fight disease. So far, the idea has proved hard to translate from lab to clinic. The researchers - from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, MA - describe their work in a paper published in the journal PLOS ONE.
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New Age of Genome Editing Could Lead to Cure for Sickle Cell Anemia

UNSW Australia researchers have shown that changing just a single letter of the DNA of human red blood cells in the laboratory increases their production of oxygen-carrying haemoglobin -- a world-first advance that could lead to a cure for sickle cell anemia and other blood disorders. The new genome editing technique, in which a beneficial, naturally-occurring genetic mutation is introduced into cells, works by switching on a sleeping gene that is active in the womb but turned off in most people after birth. "An exciting new age of genome editing is beginning, now that single genes within our vast genome can be precisely cut and repaired," says study leader, Dean of Science at UNSW, Professor Merlin Cr
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Gene Therapy Comes of Age

It seldom happens that a premature shoot of genius ever arrives at maturity. One such shoot, gene therapy, appears to be one of the exceptions. Gene therapy, which showed early promise as a means of replacing defective or missing genes, is branching out. And it may yet produce abundant and diverse fruits. For example, gene therapy is being cultivated in cardiovascular applications, which are relevant to large, broad-based patient populations. Gene therapy approaches to cardiovascular and other diseases are being tended in billion-dollar collaborations, and they are being evaluated in late-stage clinical trials. Current gene therapy products in development utilize a variety of viral vectors. Some of them integrate into the host cell genome to achieve long-term protein expression; others do not, aiming for only transient expression of a therapeutic product.
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