Press Release: Ichor Partner Scancell Announces Update on SCIB1 Phase 1/2 Clinical Trial in Stage III and IV Melanoma Patients

SAN DIEGO, JUNE 2, 2015 -- Ichor Medical Systems, Inc. (Ichor) is pleased to announce that their partner Scancell Holdings plc (Scancell) presented updated and very encouraging data from the ongoing Phase 1/2 clinical trial of SCIB1, its DNA ImmunoBody® being developed for the treatment of patients with melanoma, at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting in Chicago. The trial is an open label, non-randomized study to characterize the safety and tolerability of SCIB1 administered using Ichor’s TriGridTM delivery system, as well as provide initial assessment of the ability of SCIB1 to delay or prevent disease recurrence in patients with Stage III/IV melanoma.
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Gene Therapy Shows Early Promise Against Deadly Brain Cancer

Early trials of a new form of gene therapy may give hope to patients battling glioblastoma, the most deadly form of brain cancer. Called AdV-Tk therapy, the new treatment involves two steps. As the researchers explained it, the first step involves taking DNA from the herpes virus and injecting it into tumor cells, and then attacking those DNA-tagged cells with a powerful drug. In the second step, the drug helps spur the patient's immune systems to eliminate more of the cancer cells over time. All of the patients in the study had also undergone surgeries aimed at minimizing the tumor, the researchers noted
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Scientists Closing in on Vaccine to Control High Blood Pressure

A new study indicates that scientists have inched closer to developing a vaccine to control blood pressure amid lingering issues with cardiovascular disease, including within the Hispanic/Latino community. Among Hispanics who've experienced a stroke, 72 percent had high blood pressure, compared to 66 percent in non-Hispanic whites. Osaka University in Japan has led the advancement in blood pressure vaccine, and the study's findings appeared in the journal Hypertension on Tuesday, May 26, in an article titled "Long-Term Reduction of High Blood Pressure by Angiotensin II DNA Vaccine in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.
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‘Cell-Squeezing’ Expands Options for Immunotherapy Vaccines

Using microfluidic technology, scientists have developed a way to squeeze immune system B cells so their membranes develop temporary holes, allowing the insertion of antigens that program specific immune responses. The technique promises to open new ways to realize the dream of immunotherapy - using patients' own immune systems to fight disease. So far, the idea has proved hard to translate from lab to clinic. The researchers - from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, MA - describe their work in a paper published in the journal PLOS ONE.
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New Age of Genome Editing Could Lead to Cure for Sickle Cell Anemia

UNSW Australia researchers have shown that changing just a single letter of the DNA of human red blood cells in the laboratory increases their production of oxygen-carrying haemoglobin -- a world-first advance that could lead to a cure for sickle cell anemia and other blood disorders. The new genome editing technique, in which a beneficial, naturally-occurring genetic mutation is introduced into cells, works by switching on a sleeping gene that is active in the womb but turned off in most people after birth. "An exciting new age of genome editing is beginning, now that single genes within our vast genome can be precisely cut and repaired," says study leader, Dean of Science at UNSW, Professor Merlin Cr
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Gene Therapy Comes of Age

It seldom happens that a premature shoot of genius ever arrives at maturity. One such shoot, gene therapy, appears to be one of the exceptions. Gene therapy, which showed early promise as a means of replacing defective or missing genes, is branching out. And it may yet produce abundant and diverse fruits. For example, gene therapy is being cultivated in cardiovascular applications, which are relevant to large, broad-based patient populations. Gene therapy approaches to cardiovascular and other diseases are being tended in billion-dollar collaborations, and they are being evaluated in late-stage clinical trials. Current gene therapy products in development utilize a variety of viral vectors. Some of them integrate into the host cell genome to achieve long-term protein expression; others do not, aiming for only transient expression of a therapeutic product.
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Experimental Gene Therapy Holds Promise Against Metastatic Prostate Cancer

Even with the best available treatments, the median survival of patients with metastatic, hormone-refractory prostate cancer is only two to three years. Driven by the need for more effective therapies for these patients, researchers at VCU Massey Cancer Center and the VCU Institute of Molecular Medicine (VIMM) have developed a unique approach that uses microscopic gas bubbles to deliver directly to the cancer a viral gene therapy in combination with an experimental drug that targets a specific gene driving the cancer's growth. Recently published in the journal Oncotarget, this new study is the most recent in a long line of studies led by Paul B. Fisher, M.Ph., Ph.D., investigating the use of viral gene therapy to treat a variety of cancers. The treatment strategy uses a novel "cancer terminator virus" (CTV), which replicates exclusively in cancer cells delivering the cancer-specific, toxic cytokine gene mda-7/IL-24 directly to the tumor. The researchers added an experimental drug known as BI-97D6, which targets MCL-1 and other members of the Bcl-2 gene family that protect cancer cells from therapeutic agents, resulting in enhanced prostate cancer cell death while sparing healthy prostate epithelial cells in preclinical experiments involving advanced mouse models of prostate cancer. The therapy not only killed cells at the primary tumor site, but also in distant metastases by "bystander" antitumor activity driven by the secreted MDA-7/IL-24 protein.
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Inovio Initiates Clinical Trial With DNA Immunotherapies to Prevent and Treat Ebola

Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced today that the company has initiated a phase I trial to evaluate safety, tolerability and immune responses of Inovio's DNA immunotherapy for Ebola. In previously published preclinical testing, Inovio's DNA-based Ebola immunotherapy protected 100% of immunized animals from death and sickness after being exposed to a lethal dose of the Ebola virus. This is the first step in the Inovio-led consortium selected by the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to take a multi-faceted approach to develop products to both prevent and treat Ebola infection.
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Advanced Viral Gene Therapy Eradicates Prostate Cancer in Preclinical Experiments

Even with the best available treatments, the median survival of patients with metastatic, hormone-refractory prostate cancer is only two to three years. Driven by the need for more effective therapies for these patients, researchers at VCU Massey Cancer Center and the VCU Institute of Molecular Medicine (VIMM) have developed a unique approach that uses microscopic gas bubbles to deliver directly to the cancer a viral gene therapy in combination with an experimental drug that targets a specific gene driving the cancer's growth. Recently published in the journal Oncotarget, this new study is the most recent in a long line of studies led by Paul B. Fisher, M.Ph., Ph.D., investigating the use of viral gene therapy to treat a variety of cancers. The treatment strategy uses a novel "cancer terminator virus" (CTV), which replicates exclusively in cancer cells delivering the cancer-specific, toxic cytokine gene mda-7/IL-24 directly to the tumor. The researchers added an experimental drug known as BI-97D6, which targets MCL-1 and other members of the Bcl-2 gene family that protect cancer cells from therapeutic agents, resulting in enhanced prostate cancer cell death while sparing healthy prostate epithelial cells in preclinical experiments involving advanced mouse models of prostate cancer. The therapy not only killed cells at the primary tumor site, but also in distant metastases by "bystander" antitumor activity driven by the secreted MDA-7/IL-24 protein.
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Woodlands Based DNA Plasmid Manufacturer Receives $45M Grant for Ebola Vaccine

A breakthrough in infectious disease control, specifically Ebola, is evolving, and it’s taking place right here in The Woodlands. A $45 million dollar DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) grant was awarded to Inovio Pharmaceuticals, Inc., that has enabled the company to produce the vaccine at the facility of its manufacturing partner, VGXI in The Woodlands, in an effort to expedite the development for prevention and treatment of Ebola. Due to the global concerns and immediacy of need, an aggressive timeline has been set for the development of the Ebola vaccine. A Phase 1 clinical trial will begin within a couple of weeks to test the vaccine.
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